East Tennessee State University Engineering Technology, Surveying & Digital Media

Industrial Technology

Goals



The ETSU Industrial Technology (IT) concentration is a manufacturing and management-oriented curriculum with studies drawn from a variety of disciplines related to industry.  The IT program is designed to educate students to be managers in industry and other technological settings.  Graduates will have gained fundamental technical knowledge and also an understanding of the supervisory and management techniques used throughout industry. Technical competence is developed through various laboratory courses in the Department of Engineering Technology, Surveying, and Digital Media, while management skills and knowledge are supplemented through select courses from the ETSU College of Business & Technology Department of Management and Marketing.

Industrial Technology graduates develop skills to help solve managerial, technical, and production problems and find numerous employment opportunities in a wide range of industrial settings.  Prior to graduation, qualified students may take advantage of numerous local and/or regional Co-op (for ETSU credit) or part time/full time (non-credit) employment opportunities to earn money and gain experience.


Faculty



Curriculum



To graduate from ETSU with a degree in Industrial Technology a student must complete a total of 120 hours. These hours contain:

General Education

ENGL 1010 Critical Reading and Expository Writing

Writing paragraphs and essays based on close readings of various texts, with an emphasis on clear, grammatically correct expository prose. Students must take this course during the first eligible semester at the university. Students must earn a grade of “C” or above to pass this course. These courses do no assign grades C-, D+, or D.

ENGL 1020 Critical Thinking and Argumentation

Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 or equivalent. Writing essays based on critical analyses of various literary texts. Emphasis on sound argumentative techniques. Requires documented research paper. Students must earn a grade of “C” or above to pass this course. These courses do no assign grades C-, D+, or D.

Oral Communication (choose 1)

Literature (choose 1)

Fine Arts Elective (choose 1)

ENTC 3020 Technology & Society

Prerequisites: ENGL 1020. How does technology impact society and one?s daily life? Historical aspects of the development of technology beginning with Stone Age peoples through the Industrial Revolution, to modern concepts. An atmosphere where group discussions struggle with some of the dilemmas of modern life. (fall, spring, summer)

Social/Behavioral Sciences (choose 1)

Social/Behavioral Sciences (choose 1)

HIST 2010 The United States to 1877

A survey of the settlement and development of the colonies, the revolutionary period, the making of the Constitution, the diplomatic, economic, and political problems of the new government, the nature of economic sectionalism, Jacksonian democracy, territorial expansion, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIST 2020 The United States since 1877

Growth of the United States as an industrial and world power since Reconstruction.

MATH 1530 Probability and Statistics – Noncalculus

Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra. Descriptive statistics and its relevance, including probability, experimentation, measurement, sampling and surveys, informal statistical inference, and hypothesis testing are included.

PHYS 2010 General Physics I Noncalculus

A survey of the topics in classical physics intended primarily for students in preprofessional curricula and majors in various engineering technology concentrations. (Engineering transfer students should take PHYS 2110.) Topics include mechanics, solids, fluids, and thermodynamics. A good working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry (at least at the high school level) is required before taking this course. Heavy emphasis is made for the solutions to numerical problems. PHYS 2010 is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in general physics. (Many curricula require a laboratory course in physics. Students in these curricula must also take PHYS 2011.) Three hours of lecture each week.

PHYS 2011 General Physics Laboratory I-Noncalculus

Experiments dealing with the basic laws of physics, designed to reinforce and supplement concepts learned in PHYS 2010. A good working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry (at least at the high school level) is required before taking this course. One (2) two-hour lab each week. Note: Lecture courses requiring a lab can be taken together or separately, but must both be completed by graduation.

CHEM 1110 General Chemistry

Corequistes: CHEM 1111. The basic course for students who expect to major in chemistry, as well as those who wish to meet entrance requirements of professional schools. Three (3) hours of lecture-recitation per week. A common grade will be given.

CHEM 1111 General Chemistry Laboratory I

Corequistes: CHEM 1110. One (3) three-hour lab per week. A common grade will be given.

CSCI 1100 Using Information Technology

Students will gain a working knowledge of word-processing, spreadsheets, electronic communication, and online database searching and will learn the skills necessary to integrate electronic information from various sources. Students learn through both lecture and hands-on experience. (fall, spring, summer)


Technology Core Requirements

ENTC 1510 Student in University

This course is meant to provide guidance to first-year university students as they begin their search for directions to take in self-definition, intellectual growth, career choices, and life skills. (fall, spring)

ENTC 2170 CADD

Fundamentals of engineering drawing and sketching: orthographic projections, dimensioning, tolerancing, and scaling. Introduction to the CAD interface and environment; 2D drawing basics; using object snaps, layers, blocks, dimensioning; introduction to 3D modeling; extrusions, revolves, and rendering. (fall, spring, summer)

ENTC 3030 Technical Communication

Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. A comprehensive study of technical and professional communication in written and oral form. Covers rhetorical principles and their application in a variety of types of business correspondence, reports, and technical/scientific documents. Lecture and classroom exercises. (fall, spring, summer)

ENTC 4017 Industrial Supervision

Behavioral studies related to supervision. Supervisory functions, motivation, interviewing, and personal advancement. Lecture, case studies, discussions, and reports. (fall, spring)

ENTC 4060 Project Scheduling

Prerequisites: Junior/ Senior standing or instructor approval. A detailed study in planning, organizing, and controlling projects. Computer software is used to schedule projects Emphasis is placed on time, resources, and capital considerations for the project. Lecture, team exercises, extensive laboratory, and presentations. (fall, spring, summer)

ENTC 4600 Technology Practicum

Prerequisites: Senior standing, ENTC 3030, and at least 24 credits in a technology concentration. A senior-level capstone course in advanced problem solving by organized team methods. Requires the student to synthesize and apply subject matter studies in previous required courses. For example, in manufacturing, students will draw upon their knowledge of product design and manufacturing methods to solve a complex problem. Units of instruction will include project planning (GANTT and PERT), human factors, design aesthetics, systems methods, and group dynamics. Major requirements include a team presentation and a comprehensive technical report. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring))


Industrial Technology Core Requirements

ENTC 1120 Manufacturing Processes & Specification

Prerequisites: ENTC 1110 or equivalent. The study of manufacturing processes and development of engineering documentation with particular emphasis on size specification and information processes required in a modern manufacturing environment and the physical processes involved in the manufacture of goods. Lecture (spring)

ENTC 2200 Machine Tool Technology

Prerequisites: ENTC 2170 and MATH 1720. The use of metalworking machine tools and accessories including the mill, lathe, saw, drill press, and surface grinder with emphasis on safety, precision measuring tools, and hand tools. Machining characteristics of commonly machined metals, cutting speeds, and feed rates. Cutting tool types, geometry, and applications. Lecture and lab. (fall)

ENTC 2310 Electrical Principles or ENTC 3650 Industrial Electronics

ENTC 2310 Prerequisites: MATH 1720. Introduction to electricity, DC circuits, power, DC meters, conductors, insulators, capacitance, magnetism, and electromagnetic induction AC circuits, reactance, impedance, AC power, power factor, and resonance. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)ENTC 3650 Geared for construction technology and technology education students only or permission of instructor. Practical application of commercial house wiring and electrical code. Electrical machines and controls, electronic devices. (fall, spring)

ENTC 3600 Manufacturing Technology

Prerequisites: ENTC 2200. This course has as its primary emphasis the study of the management and production aspects of manufacturing. Students will have the opportunity to learn mass-production principles and methods, including the use of computers and robotics. Laboratory experiences will revolve around the design, planning, and mass production of an item. (fall)

ENTC 3620 Thermal & Fluid Technologies or ENTC 3670 Energy/Power/Trans.

ENTC 3620 Prerequisites: MATH 1840 and PHYS 2010/PHYS 2011. A study of the fundamentals of heat transfer and fluid flow. Topics include modes of heat transfer and material characteristics, hydraulics and fluid systems. Students will choose concluding topics of either hydrology or hydraulic control systems and pneumatics. Laboratory use of personal computers in data acquisition, experiment control, and report writing. Lecture and lab. (spring) ENTC 3650 Geared for construction technology and technology education students only or permission of instructor. Practical application of commercial house wiring and electrical code. Electrical machines and controls, electronic devices. (fall, spring)

ENTC 4037 Quality Assurance I

Prerequisites: MATH 1530.Objectives of quality control in manufacturing. Control charts for variables, control charts for attributes, and lot by lot acceptance sampling for attributes (ANSI/ASQC Z1.4). The statistical approach to methods and procedures associated with quality assurance in manufacturing processes. Lecture (fall)

ENTC 4227 Engineering Economy

Prerequisites: MATH 1720 or permission of the instructor. An economic study of manufacturing. amortization, cash flow, rates of return, depreciation, and present worth analyses. Lecture (fall)

ENTC 4357 CIM Applications

Prerequisites: Junior standing. An interdisciplinary course concerned with the concepts of business, computers, and manufacturing designed to explore the integration of these dynamic disciplines in the development of the Computer- Integrated Enterprise. Field trips, lab activities, and demonstrations will be used to support the lectures. (fall)

ENTC 4777 Safety Management

Prerequisites: PSYC 1310 and junior standing. A study of the methods of planning, organizing, and controlling a safety program. The study will include the safety problem, accident causation, motivational and marketing methods of safety, safety training and leadership, and a study of OSHA and TOSHA practices and procedures. (fall, spring)


Technical Support Courses

ENTC 1510 Student in University

This course is meant to provide guidance to first-year university students as they begin their search for directions to take in self-definition, intellectual growth, career choices, and life skills. (fall, spring)

ENTC 2170 CADD

Fundamentals of engineering drawing and sketching: orthographic projections, dimensioning, tolerancing, and scaling. Introduction to the CAD interface and environment; 2D drawing basics; using object snaps, layers, blocks, dimensioning; introduction to 3D modeling; extrusions, revolves, and rendering. (fall, spring, summer)

ENTC 3030 Technical Communication

Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. A comprehensive study of technical and professional communication in written and oral form. Covers rhetorical principles and their application in a variety of types of business correspondence, reports, and technical/scientific documents. Lecture and classroom exercises. (fall, spring, summer)

ENTC 4017 Industrial Supervision

Behavioral studies related to supervision. Supervisory functions, motivation, interviewing, and personal advancement. Lecture, case studies, discussions, and reports. (fall, spring)

ENTC 4060 Project Scheduling

Prerequisites: Junior/ Senior standing or instructor approval. A detailed study in planning, organizing, and controlling projects. Computer software is used to schedule projects Emphasis is placed on time, resources, and capital considerations for the project. Lecture, team exercises, extensive laboratory, and presentations. (fall, spring, summer)

ENTC 4600 Technology Practicum

Prerequisites: Senior standing, ENTC 3030, and at least 24 credits in a technology concentration. A senior-level capstone course in advanced problem solving by organized team methods. Requires the student to synthesize and apply subject matter studies in previous required courses. For example, in manufacturing, students will draw upon their knowledge of product design and manufacturing methods to solve a complex problem. Units of instruction will include project planning (GANTT and PERT), human factors, design aesthetics, systems methods, and group dynamics. Major requirements include a team presentation and a comprehensive technical report. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring))

The Industrial Technology program has the widest range of technology (ENTC) and general electives of any of the Department’s concentrations.  ENTC and general electives should be selected with the goal of developing a depth of understanding in one or two technical areas. Students are encouraged to select elective courses from manufacturing, electronics, design graphics, construction, computer & information science, management/marketing, surveying/mapping, &/or environmental health.

Program Check-off Sheet